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  • November 15, 2020 - Telegram & Gazette

    Kathleen Driscoll officially assumed her role as UMass Memorial Health Care’s senior vice president and chief philanthropy officer, a newly established position, April 6 as coronavirus cases were surging, intensive care units were filling, and, as part of leading the region’s response to the pandemic, UMMHC was days away from opening the DCU Center as the state’s first field hospital.

  • November 13, 2020 - Worcester Business Journal

    Worcester's DCU Center will once again be used as a field hospital to help handle an expected surge of coronavirus cases this fall and winter.

    The hospital is expected to open around Dec. 6, UMass Memorial Health Care President and CEO Dr. Eric Dickson said in a staff memo Friday. Gov. Charlie Baker detailed some plans for additional bed capacity at a press conference Friday afternoon, saying the DCU Center will have roughly 240 beds.

  • November 11, 2020 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Medical Center is no longer allowing visitors to its University Campus in Worcester in a new policy started Tuesday night.

    The policy change comes as the campus is seeing a rising number of coronavirus cases, a trend taking place both statewide and nationally. In the most recent data available from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, UMass Memorial's University Campus had 10 inpatient coronavirus cases, with three in intensive care as of Nov. 1.

  • November 11, 2020 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Health Care is working with state officials on plans for potentially opening a field hospital in Worcester as was done during the height of the coronavirus pandemic in the spring at the DCU Center.

    Dr. Eric Dickson, UMass Memorial's president and CEO, said in a statement Wednesday that the health system is prepared to set the field hospital back up again if asked to do so.

  • November 10, 2020 - GBH

    The coronavirus pandemic has been making its way through Massachusetts for just about eight months now.

    And all the while, doctors, nurses and hospital staff have been heading to work and caring for patients.

    But many are worried about burnout among this workforce — especially with no exact end date in sight.

  • November 9, 2020 - Fox 25 Boston

    Scientists in Cambridge and throughout the country have been working around the clock to come up with a vaccine for the novel coronavirus.

    For one local woman, she says that when she noticed the death rate in her own community keep rising, she had to do something about it.

    Gina Plata-Nino, who is Latina, said she wanted to be part of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine trial so her community could feel safe.

  • November 9, 2020 - Boston 25 News

    When it comes to vaccines, everything depends on trust.

    “It’s still skeptical so I’m gonna still keep doing what I’m doing, social distancing until there’s consistency behind it,” said Boston resident Will Lature.

    Even with Pfizer Inc. announcing that its COVID-19 vaccine may be a remarkable 90% effective, based on early and incomplete test results, some people remain less trusting than others.

  • November 5, 2020 - Telegram & Gazette

    The number of children and adolescents seen at the UMass Memorial Medical Center - University Campus for behavioral health needs, including intentional medication overdoses and other suicide attempts, tripled last month, leaving the hospital with a waiting list for beds to treat them.

    Dr. Brian Skehan, director of Child Emergency Mental Health and Child Consult Liaison of Psychiatry at the hospital, said Thursday that he had never before seen a problem this severe throughout the state and he blames the pandemic.

  • November 4, 2020 - Worcester Business Journal

    When Tamara Lundi is working as the CEO of Worcester’s Community Healthlink, she’s not only leading a healthcare center with hundreds of workers. She’s making the job better for the former, early-career version of her: Someone working one-on-one with clients and hoping to make things better in any way possible.

  • November 4, 2020 - Boston Business Journal

    In the midst of dealing with the start of a second coronavirus surge, some hospitals are also readying to respond to election turmoil.

    Much about the election may remain uncertain in the coming days or weeks, as votes are tallied across the country. But hospitals are preparing for a potential increase in volume, whether from violence associated with potential protests or stressed-out residents.

  • November 3, 2020 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester is tightening visitor restrictions again as coronavirus cases rise in the city and across Central Massachusetts.

    Beginning Tuesday, the hospital is allowing only one visitor per day for patients who haven't been diagnosed with coronavirus or are under investigation of having it. Patients who have coronavirus or are under investigation are not allowed any visitors, nor are ambulatory patients.

  • November 1, 2020 - Boston 25 News

    A 'second surge': UMass Memorial CEO says hospitalizations are rising.

  • October 29, 2020 - Mass Live

    A group of Worcester area leaders on Thursday said that being anti-racist and addressing internal biases is what’s needed amid the coronavirus pandemic, which has affected the region’s Latinx and Black residents to a higher degree.

  • October 28, 2020 - WBZ 4 CBS Boston

    There is a sense of calm inside the Marlborough Hospital Intensive Care Unit. Two rooms are open; only one patient is on a ventilator; and the nurses and staff chat in a relaxed manner.

    Dr. Kim Robinson, a pulmonologist and head of the Critical Care Team at Marlborough says it was a very different scene during the spring coronavirus surge.

    “We would get calls – this patient’s oxygen level is low; this patient is setting off alarms on the ventilator – and you needed to run into every room to check on these patients,” Robinson said.

  • October 13, 2020 - Fox 25 Boston

    As two COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials and an antibody treatment experiment have been put on hold, there is concern for people’s hope for the ongoing efforts to fight the virus.

    Anxieties can run high when the news is flooded with reports of clinical trial participants falling ill and less than ideal setbacks in what seems to be our only hope in ending the pandemic.

  • October 13, 2020 - Fox 25 Boston

    On Tuesday, Governor Charlie Baker assessed the state’s response to the COVID-19 crisis, saying we have learned so much since the spring surge.

    “We’re going to be living with Covid until there is a vaccine or treatment,” Baker said Tuesday afternoon during a news conference. “But the Commonwealth’s response to this pandemic has been transformational since last spring in nearly every aspect of our daily lives.”

  • October 6, 2020 - Business Wire

    In an article published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Network Open (https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/27

  • October 6, 2020 - Boston Business Journal

    In a year unlike any other, the leaders of Greater Boston's business community are meeting the challenges of 2020 head on.

  • October 5, 2020 - WBZ 4 CBS Boston

    One of the treatments President Trump is receiving for the coronavirus is raising questions for some doctors.

    The President’s doctors say Mr. Trump is taking a steroid called dexamethasone to combat inflammation. It was shown in a study to reduce mortality in patients severely ill with COVID-19.

    Dr. Nicholas Smyrnios, a pulmonologist at UMass Memorial Hospital Medical Center says steroids, such as dexamethasone, have the potential to do harm as well.

  • September 25, 2020 - Boston 25 News

    Healthcare systems across the Commonwealth are readying their COVID-19 surge plans ahead of an anticipated second wave of the virus. Experts predict COVID-19 could once again overwhelm the state next month.

    But staying ahead of a virus that is known to mutate won’t be easy for hospitals, as they must be prepared for whatever comes their way.

    “This is the calm before the second storm. But nobody knows just which way this is going to go and where it’s going to end up,” said Dr. Eric Dickson, president and CEO of UMass Memorial Health Care.

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