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  • September 12, 2019 - The Trace

    Following this summer’s spate of high-profile mass shootings, lawmakers in Washington are again debating if and how they should regulate assault weapons. Republicans have staked out a familiar position, resisting any new restrictions with warnings about a breach of constitutional rights. But a dozen Democratic presidential candidates have endorsed an idea unprecedented for the federal government: an assault weapons buyback. And several prominent candidates think it should be mandatory.

  • September 11, 2019 - Mass Live

    Getting into his second year as the president of UMass Memorial Medical Center, Michael Gustafson wants to learn more about Worcester.

    Gustafson was named president of the medical center last year after the retirement of Patrick Muldoon.

    Gustafson said a big focus for him in the first year as president was to work with the hospital’s leadership team and improve relationships with unions.

  • August 30, 2019 - Telegram & Gazette

    There were 2,032 purple flags planted Thursday morning on the quadrangle at UMass Memorial Medical Center and University of Massachusetts Medical School, one for each person who died from an opioid overdose in the state in 2018. That’s 50 fewer than the previous year, but still far too many, according to organizers and family members of victims.

  • August 30, 2019 - Worcester Business Journal

    Doctors at UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester are the first in New England to use a newly approved device that has been used in only 3,000 procedures to treat aneurysms.

    The device, Comaneci, was approved for U.S. use by the Food & Drug Administration in May.

  • August 23, 2019 - Worcester Business Journal

    Outpatient surgery centers benefit patients by having lower costs and avoiding a trip to a hospital campus – enough of a lure for health providers who otherwise could be seen as close competitors to join together to create one such center in Shrewsbury.

  • August 20, 2019 - CBSBoston

    It’s the latest generation of robotic surgery, but don’t worry there’s a doctor controlling its every move. And that means increased precision and shorter recovery times.

    WBZ got a surgeon’s eye view of how it works. “What’s important about the robot for me is that this is the way technology is going to go for the next generation,” said Dr. John Kelly, the chief of general surgery at UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester.

  • August 17, 2019 - Telegram & Gazette

    It can be hard for children and teens to turn down sugary drinks in favor of something more healthy when supersized sweetened beverages are all around. Sodas, fruit drinks, even wholesome-sounding sports drinks and smoothies can pack a few hundred calories of largely sugar into a child’s diet, increasing obesity risk.

  • August 15, 2019 - Worcester Business Journal

    Overcrowding of hospital emergency departments has become a major factor in safety problems or potential ones, according to a new Massachusetts government report.

    A report released Tuesday by the Betsy Lehman Center for Patient Safety, a state agency aiming to reduce patient harm, estimates between roughly half and four-fifths of what it calls adverse incidents in emergency departments are largely avoidable.

  • August 14, 2019 - Boston Globe

    Six-year-old Cameron Williams bounded down the steep steps of the outdoor bleachers at Boston’s English High School on a sweltering evening. He paused, wide-eyed, to watch an adult kickboxing class on his way to a youth track and field program.

    “Be careful, it’s hot,” called his attentive grandmother, Gail Williams, 68, of Roxbury. “Don’t go over there, Cam. . . . Hey, young man, your program’s about to start.”

  • August 2, 2019 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester landed sixth in Massachusetts in the new U.S. News & World Report rankings of the best hospitals.

    UMass Memorial was the only hospital in Central Massachusetts to reach what the report said were high enough standards for a numbered ranking in the annual review released this week. Nine hospitals in the state made the designation, topped by Massachusetts General Hospital, which landed second nationally.

  • August 1, 2019 - Lowell Sun

    Speed and accuracy can make all the difference for physicians facing a life-threatening situation, especially when it entails the well-being of a newborn.

    There's no time for a wrong or delayed decision when an infant's life hangs in the balance.

  • August 1, 2019 - Lowell Sun

    Speed and accuracy can make all the difference for physicians facing a life-threatening situation, especially when it entails the well-being of a newborn.

    There's no time for a wrong or delayed decision when an infant's life hangs in the balance.

  • August 1, 2019 - Lowell Sun

    Speed and accuracy can make all the difference for physicians facing a life-threatening situation, especially when it entails the well-being of a newborn.

    There's no time for a wrong or delayed decision when an infant's life hangs in the balance.

  • July 30, 2019 - Sentinel and Enterprise

    Babies born in distress at UMass Memorial HealthAlliance-Clinton Hospital's Leominster campus will soon have enhanced access to high-level neonatological intensive care, as the hospital prepares to launch Central Massachusetts' first-ever tele-NICU program.

    As it stands, UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester is the only hospital in Central Mass. with a level-3 NICU, which provides care to the youngest and sickest newborns, according to Dr. Javed Mannan, a UMass neonatologist.

     

  • July 30, 2019 - Sentinel and Enterprise

    Babies born in distress at UMass Memorial HealthAlliance-Clinton Hospital's Leominster campus will soon have enhanced access to high-level neonatological intensive care, as the hospital prepares to launch Central Massachusetts' first-ever tele-NICU program.

    As it stands, UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester is the only hospital in Central Mass. with a level-3 NICU, which provides care to the youngest and sickest newborns, according to Dr. Javed Mannan, a UMass neonatologist.

     

  • July 27, 2019 - Boston Globe

    Red Sox icon David Ortiz has been released from Massachusetts General Hospital, almost seven weeks after he suffered a life-threatening gunshot wound in his back that required three surgeries, the team said Saturday.

    The Red Sox issued a brief statement, but declined to describe his condition.

  • July 22, 2019 - Telegram & Gazette

    A 30-year-old woman who is battling an aggressive form of breast cancer posed nude for a studio full of artists on Monday, the night before she was to enter the hospital for a double mastectomy.

    “You always think you’re going to get more time, but to be quite frank, life doesn’t give a (expletive) about time,” said Courtney Elizabeth Young of Worcester, who modeled for the “Smash Cancer!” figure drawing class at the Worcester PopUp at 20 Franklin St.

  • July 14, 2019 - Telegram & Gazette

    WORCESTER - Amanda Dabrowski, the 31-year-old Webster native who was fatally stabbed at O’Connor’s Restaurant & Bar July 3, allegedly by a man she had dated briefly, had done everything right.

    She had gone in April to police in Ayer, where she was living, after a violent home invasion and attack, allegedly by Carlos Asencio, 28, a New Hampshire resident who is the same man charged with her murder. The attack at her home occurred roughly a week after Mr. Asencio had tried to get back together with Ms. Dabrowski but she had turned him down.

  • July 11, 2019 - Boston Globe

    David Ortiz underwent a third surgery this week at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he continues to recover more than a month after a shooting ambush in the Dominican Republic, the retired Red Sox slugger’s wife said Thursday.

  • July 10, 2019 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Health Care has received a gold achievement award from the American Heart Association for guidelines for caring patients with heart conditions.

    The honor, which the Worcester healthcare organization announced Wednesday, is for implementing guidelines outlined by the American Heart Association for caring for patients with atrial fibrillation, a heart condition known as AFib. It is the highest honor for such care given by the association, according to UMass.

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