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UMass Memorial in the News

 

  • April 9, 2020 - Telegram & Gazette

    The field hospital at the DCU center set up to accept overflow cases of COVID-19 became operational at 7 a.m. Thursday.

    At 7:01 a.m., it got its first call, and later in the day, staff were in discussions with Boston-area medical centers about transferring patients, said Dr. Eric W. Dickson, president and chief executive officer of UMass Memorial Health Care, which is overseeing the facility’s operation.

  • April 9, 2020 - Mass Live

    Brianna Fleming’s car is filled to the top with Gatorade, goldfish and bags of chips. She’s up to her ears in Pop-Tarts. And she’s started putting more boxes of snacks in her manager’s office.

    She’s not hoarding, or personally stocking up due to coronavirus concerns. The stroke-certified acute care neurological nurse has started creating “power baskets” for fellow doctors and nurses at UMass Memorial Health Care.

  • April 9, 2020 - Mass Live

    The DCU Center opened its doors Thursday as the first field hospital in the state amid the coronavirus pandemic, but it may not be used immediately, officials in Worcester said.

    The DCU Center has the capacity to offer Worcester’s hospitals a surge capacity of 250 beds. As of Wednesday evening, both St. Vincent Hospital and UMass Memorial Medical Center were handling the volume of patients during the pandemic.

  • April 9, 2020 - Mass Live

    The DCU Center opened its doors Thursday as the first field hospital in the state amid the coronavirus pandemic, but it may not be used immediately, officials in Worcester said.

    The DCU Center has the capacity to offer Worcester’s hospitals a surge capacity of 250 beds. As of Wednesday evening, both St. Vincent Hospital and UMass Memorial Medical Center were handling the volume of patients during the pandemic.

  • April 8, 2020 - Telegram & Gazette

    The number of people in the city infected with COVID-19 surpassed 400 Wednesday, as city officials continued to highlight the preparation and precautions taken less than two weeks before an expected wave of patients.

    City schools are closed until at least the beginning of May because of the pandemic, but Mayor Joseph M. Petty said Wednesday the School Committee, which he chairs, voted to cancel April vacation, which had been scheduled for April 20 to April 24.

  • April 5, 2020 - Telegram & Gazette

    As COVID-19 cases in Worcester County continue to rise toward an expected mid-month crescendo, leaders in health care and government believe the region is as prepared as possible to fight a virus projected to kill between 750 and 2,500 state residents by May.

    “I think we’re probably the best prepared of anybody in the state,” Eric W. Dickson, president of UMass Memorial Health Care, said in an interview Tuesday.

  • April 4, 2020 - Boston Herald

     Massachusetts hospital networks bracing for a coronavirus surge in the next 10 days are adding critical care beds, moving around patients and supplies, transforming facilities into dedicated COVID-19 centers and reassigning doctors in an “all hands on deck” approach, hospital leaders told the Herald Sunday.

    “It’s almost like playing chess to balance the care for our patients,” Richard Nest

  • April 3, 2020 - Mass Live

    During the COVID-19 pandemic, Dr. Eric Dickson, the CEO of UMass Memorial Health Care, and Dr. Cathy Jones, Dicksons’ wife and a UMass Memorial physician, are donating all of their paychecks to the health care system’s employee assistance fund, officials said Friday.

    The husband and wife are both emergency physicians. Kathleen Driscoll, who starts Monday as the health care system’s new chief philanthropy officer, announced the donations on Friday.

  • April 2, 2020 - Eyeworld

    For Shlomit Schaal, MD, her renowned retina work is just one of the passions she engages in on a daily basis. Another is competitive swimming. Dr. Schaal was actually afraid of the water until she was 12, despite the fact that she grew up in Israel where there’s year-round sunshine and water sports predominate. It was her father who pressed her to learn, especially because it is a potentially lifesaving skill.
     

  • April 2, 2020 - Telegram & Gazette

    The rooms are full of UMass Memorial Medical Center nurses and doctors at the front lines of treatment for the coronavirus.

    But they’re practicing social distancing — because, in fact, those front lines are phone lines.

    “The whole triage center is designed to help anyone with questions about COVID-19 ... and we try to deal with a lot of people here, not in the emergency room,” said Jonna Dube, senior director of ambulatory services at UMMC. “We’re really the experts now on coronavirus.”

  • April 2, 2020 - New York Times

    Last month, Susan Houghtelling, a hospital supply-chain manager in upstate New York, was facing a shortfall of medical supplies when her inbox suddenly flooded with offers.

    There were advertisements for gallons of hand sanitizer, crates of isolation gowns and, most crucially, pallets of N95 masks — perhaps the most sought-after product on the planet. All were for prices that were multiples higher than what she normally paid.

  • March 30, 2020 - Boston Globe

    State officials Monday were scrambling to find about 1,000 skilled nursing beds for recovering COVID-19 patients across Massachusetts, raising the possibility of relocating hundreds of nursing home residents in a first-in-the-nation plan to relieve pressure on hospitals bracing for a surge of new patients.

  • March 30, 2020 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester has set up six specialized care units for coronavirus patients and is planning to add three more, as health officials plan for a surge of patients in the days and weeks ahead.

  • March 25, 2020 - Boston Globe

    Massachusetts hospitals are scrambling to bring in more ventilators by almost any means possible, including buying and renting machines and repurposing other medical devices, in anticipation of an expected surge in critically ill coronavirus patients.

  • March 24, 2020 - Becker's Healthcare Review

    Academic medical centers play an important role in the healthcare system today, both in caring for patients across the country and devoting resources to research and innovation for the next generation of treatment.

    This list features 100 executives who lead academic medical centers and health systems across the country. The leaders highlighted here are responsible for large, often multisite institutions that provide cutting-edge technology and clinical trials.

  • March 23, 2020 - Worcester Business Journal

    COVID-19, better known as coronavirus, has trampled its way across Asia, swept through Europe and, to much American’s dismay, touched down in the USA.

    As of March 16, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported cases in 49 states with a total of 3,487 infected persons and 68 deaths.

  • March 20, 2020 - NBC Nightly News

    Major cities are warning they could run out of protective equipment for doctors and nurses within weeks, if not days. Many are now making their own masks and automakers are offering to step in to make ventilators.

  • March 19, 2020 - Child Trends

    While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) currently reports that the risk of exposure to COVID-19 is low for young Americansresearch on natural disasters makes it clear that, compared to adults, children are more vulnerable to the emotional impact of traumatic events that disrupt their daily lives.

  • March 16, 2020 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester is canceling most elective procedures starting Monday to leave capacity for potential coronavirus cases at the hospital, days before a state-mandated order for all hospitals goes into effect.

  • March 16, 2020 - Boston Globe

    Massachusetts’s biggest hospitals are preparing for a potential crush of coronavirus patients amid predictions that rapid spread of the disease could overwhelm the health care system.

    Researchers have been racing to develop models that predict the possible impact on US hospitals, and some of those forecasts are alarming — especially if intensifying efforts to contain the virus aren’t successful.

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