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UMass Memorial Medical Center News

August 5, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

Camp Kinneywood in Holden Gives City Girls of All Ages Opportunity to Learn, Thrive

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The sound of girls singing the camp cheer classic, "Boom Chicka Boom!," echoes from the covered picnic area, the epicenter of Camp Kinneywood. The rustic 90-acre property offers a plethora of outdoor opportunities for young ladies who would otherwise be cooped up inside on a hot summer day.

About 85 campers rotate between activities ranging from swimming in Crystal Pond, to hiking the surrounding woods. Each station provides special attention to each age group and their curriculum, according to Kathy Odgren, director of programming at Girl Inc. of Worcester.

  • August 6, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

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    The sound of girls singing the camp cheer classic, "Boom Chicka Boom!," echoes from the covered picnic area, the epicenter of Camp Kinneywood. The rustic 90-acre property offers a plethora of outdoor opportunities for young ladies who would otherwise be cooped up inside on a hot summer day.

  • August 6, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

    Evan “EJ” Silverberg sat on a gurney in the early-morning hours at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

    He was uncharacteristically quiet and calm, a fact that concerned his girlfriend, Gabi Depari. She sat next to him and held his hand, smiling.

    As hospital staff entered the pre-op room, excitement began to build. Ms. Depari, 22, chatted with staff. Registered nurse Jane Noonan read through the rundown of the day and talked with Mr. Silverberg, 27, about the IV in his right arm.

  • August 1, 2016 - The Trace

    Doctor Michael Hirsh knows the damage bullets can inflict on a child’s body. During his 30-year career as a pediatric surgeon in hospitals in the Northeast, he has treated scores of young patients with gunshot wounds, ranging from children accidentally shot by their siblings to teenagers determined to take their own lives.

    Since 2001, Hirsh has worked at UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, Massachusetts, where he now serves as chief of pediatric surgery. His experience in the field has led him to believe that conversations between doctors and parents about the safe storage of firearms can reduce child shootings. A new study shows that more than 65 percent of people are open to speaking with their physicians about gun ownership. But other research has found that most doctors don’t ask their patients about access to firearms. Hirsh concludes that certain state laws — such as Florida’s infamous “docs vs. glocks” ban — have had a chilling effect on his fellow physicians.

  • July 29, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

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    Legislators are scrambling this weekend to get enough votes to push through a bill that would require insurance coverage for extended treatment of Lyme disease, despite Gov. Charles D. Baker Jr.’s veto. 

    Sponsors last month attached their controversial bill as a budget amendment, which was later changed by the governor. Legislators rejected the governor’s legislation and reinstated the original language. The governor on Thursday vetoed the bill and proposed an alternative version.

  • July 28, 2016 - Worcester Business Journal

    Heywood Hospital and UMass Memorial Medical Center have received nearly $1 million in combined funds as part of a telemedicine pilot being conducted by the state.

    The announcement of the funding was made Wednesday by the Massachusetts Health Policy Commission (HPC) as part of $11.3 million in health care investments. The funding for Heywood (capped at $499,860) and UMass Medical (capped at $496,184) is designed to extend behavioral health services in populations such as children or those with substance use disorders.

  • July 27, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

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    Katy Drennan could be forgiven if she didn’t recognize the vascular surgeon who saved her life 18 years ago in California and then saved it a second time in July by performing high-risk surgery at UMass Memorial Medical Center.

    True, her mother, Lynda Yoshioka, had kept the pictures she had taken of Dr. Louis Messina and her daughter after he had operated on Katy in 1998 at the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, but, after all, Katy was only 3 years old at the time.

    Those pictures, however, did serve a purpose over the years as Katy’s mother explained to her that the scars on Katy’s body were the result of an operation she had had when she was little.

     

  • July 27, 2016 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Medical Center has received a Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts distinction for its spinal surgeries.

    The health insurer named UMass Memorial Medical Center a Blue Distinction Center for Spine Surgery last week, adding the Worcester hospital to the list of nationally designated health care facilities that deliver improved patient safety and better health outcomes, based on BCBS measures. Blue Distinction Centers for Spine Surgery need to be nationally accredited and demonstrate expertise in a number of spinal procedures, resulting in fewer complications and readmissions compared to other hospitals, according to a release from UMass Memorial.