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UMass Memorial Medical Center News

  • April 20, 2016 - Christian Science Monitor

    Last fall, employees at UMass Memorial Medical Center clicked on an e-mail that looked just like any one of the hundreds of messages that flood their inboxes daily.

    But this particular e-mail contained a hidden danger. When employees opened the message, they provided a gateway for malicious code to find its way onto several computers at the Worcester, Mass., facility – locking up dozens of files.

    Soon thereafter, hospital workers saw a warning message flash across their screens telling them to pay a what hospital officials characterized as a "hefty" bounty if they wanted to see their data again.

  • April 20, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

    Diagnosed with prostate cancer eight years ago when he was 65, Raymond Fuller had no family history of the malignancy, but he’s afraid he might have started something.

    After all, a disease that can be inherited has to start with some generation and Fuller is concerned that he might have passed a genetic legacy for prostate cancer on to his 27-year-old son.

    Of course, his son has already inherited one other thing from his father that alone would make him a high risk for prostate cancer — being African-American.

    Not only are African-American men approximately 125 percent more likely than Caucasians to develop prostate cancer, they are also 150 percent more likely to die, especially young men in their 40s, because of a more aggressive form of the malignancy.

  • April 20, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

    Diagnosed with prostate cancer eight years ago when he was 65, Raymond Fuller had no family history of the malignancy, but he’s afraid he might have started something.

    After all, a disease that can be inherited has to start with some generation and Fuller is concerned that he might have passed a genetic legacy for prostate cancer on to his 27-year-old son.

    Of course, his son has already inherited one other thing from his father that alone would make him a high risk for prostate cancer — being African-American.

    Not only are African-American men approximately 125 percent more likely than Caucasians to develop prostate cancer, they are also 150 percent more likely to die, especially young men in their 40s, because of a more aggressive form of the malignancy.

  • April 19, 2016 - Boston Globe

    The drink carts had just started to roll down the aisle on United Airlines flight 670 Saturday night when Jane Palermo saw a woman shake her husband several rows in front of her. 

    He wasn’t waking up, Palermo noticed. The wife shook him again. No response. 

    Palermo, a nurse at the UMass Memorial Medical Center with 35 years of experience, instinctively sprung into action. Having lost her husband when his heart stopped while he was home alone, Palermo knew help couldn’t wait.

  • April 19, 2016 - WHDH-TV Channel 7

    A quick-thinking nurse from Shrewsbury jumped into action during a flight, saving a fellow passenger.

    Jane Palermo is a nurse at UMass Memorial Medical Center. She was on a flight back to Boston from Cabo when she saw a passenger had stopped breathing. The passenger had suffered a heart attack. 

  • April 18, 2016 - Orthopedics This Week

    Arthur M. Pappas, M.D., the first chairman of the Department of Orthopedics at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, died on March 22, 2016 at the age of 84. A former team doctor for the Boston Red Sox, Dr. Pappas was born and raised in Auburn, Massachusetts; he and his wife lived in the house in which Dr. Pappas was born.

    Dr. Pappas leaves behind his wife, Martha Pappas, Ed.D.

    The family held a private burial service, with plans for a Celebration of Life to honor Dr. Pappas near the date of his birthday in July.

  • April 6, 2016 - Telegam & Gazette

    (Subscription May Be Required)

    Health providers at some Central Massachusetts hospitals are saving lives by using low-dose CT-scanning to screen people with a smoking history, in hopes of picking up lung cancer while it’s curable.