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UMass Memorial Medical Center News

  • May 20, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

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    More than 1.5 million in the United States and at least 5 million around the world have lupus. Each year, 16,000 new cases are diagnosed in the U.S. But, many people are unaware of this disease. 

    Lupus most often strikes women between the ages of 14 and 44, but 80 percent of women know little or nothing about the disease, according to the Congressional Lupus Caucus. The disease can affect men and people of all races and ethnic groups, though it is more common among women of color. In 1977 President Jimmy Carter started Lupus Awareness Week. In 2009, the Lupus Foundation of American began designating May as National Lupus Awareness Month.

  • May 15, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

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    UMass Memorial Medical Center consists of four Worcester campuses — University, Memorial, Hahnemann and Queen Street Medical Center — and is licensed for 779 beds and 69 bassinets. Among the four sites, the medical center has 9,600 employees and a budget of $1.6 billion. Patrick Muldoon was named president of UMass Memorial Medical Center in August 2013, shortly after Dr. Eric Dickson was appointed as chief executive officer of UMass Memorial Health Care. A native of New Bedford, Mr. Muldoon splits his time between Northboro and Jamestown, R.I. After graduating from Providence College, Mr. Muldoon began his health care administration career in Chicago. He most recently served as president of HealthAlliance Hospital, with campuses in Leominster and Fitchburg.

  • May 14, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

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    UMass Memorial Medical Center is moving ahead with an overhaul of its intensive care unit for newborns, hiring a new director who is building a roster of caregivers to replace doctors who refused to join the hospital’s staff.

    Dr. Lawrence M. Rhein, who heads an infant lung program at Boston Children’s Hospital, and the physicians he is hiring will take over operation of the medical center’s neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU, on Oct. 1.

  • May 14, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

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    Dr. Dina Kandil, a pathologist at UMass Memorial Medical Center, recently found herself needing to be at two places at once. Two patients, one at the University campus, the other at Memorial, were both in surgery. Both needed her expertise.

    “Pathology is in its own building by itself, and there is only one pathologist on call, and we cover all of UMass,” she said, which means the University Campus on Lake Avenue, the Memorial Campus on Belmont Street, and potentially the Hahnemann Campus on Lincoln Street. “In that circumstance, one patient had to wait 50 minutes until I could get there.” Another time, she called for a brain specialist, but that person was out of state and unavailable.

    As one of 19 participants this year in the Physician Leadership Development Program at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, in collaboration with UMass Memorial Medical Group, she sought $79,000 for a telepathology system as her capstone project via a competition, fashioned after ABC-TV's "Shark Tank," held May 6 at WPI.

     

  • April 20, 2016 - Christian Science Monitor

    Last fall, employees at UMass Memorial Medical Center clicked on an e-mail that looked just like any one of the hundreds of messages that flood their inboxes daily.

    But this particular e-mail contained a hidden danger. When employees opened the message, they provided a gateway for malicious code to find its way onto several computers at the Worcester, Mass., facility – locking up dozens of files.

    Soon thereafter, hospital workers saw a warning message flash across their screens telling them to pay a what hospital officials characterized as a "hefty" bounty if they wanted to see their data again.

  • April 20, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

    Diagnosed with prostate cancer eight years ago when he was 65, Raymond Fuller had no family history of the malignancy, but he’s afraid he might have started something.

    After all, a disease that can be inherited has to start with some generation and Fuller is concerned that he might have passed a genetic legacy for prostate cancer on to his 27-year-old son.

    Of course, his son has already inherited one other thing from his father that alone would make him a high risk for prostate cancer — being African-American.

    Not only are African-American men approximately 125 percent more likely than Caucasians to develop prostate cancer, they are also 150 percent more likely to die, especially young men in their 40s, because of a more aggressive form of the malignancy.

  • April 20, 2016 - Telegram & Gazette

    Diagnosed with prostate cancer eight years ago when he was 65, Raymond Fuller had no family history of the malignancy, but he’s afraid he might have started something.

    After all, a disease that can be inherited has to start with some generation and Fuller is concerned that he might have passed a genetic legacy for prostate cancer on to his 27-year-old son.

    Of course, his son has already inherited one other thing from his father that alone would make him a high risk for prostate cancer — being African-American.

    Not only are African-American men approximately 125 percent more likely than Caucasians to develop prostate cancer, they are also 150 percent more likely to die, especially young men in their 40s, because of a more aggressive form of the malignancy.