UMass Memorial Medical Center News

  • November 18, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    Victoria Perdomo said she could relate to a scene in the new movie “Wonder” where the main character, Auggie, receives notes telling him his craniofacial anomaly makes him a freak to his schoolmates.

    “Sometimes they would pass notes to me - tell me I’m ugly and a freak,” said Ms. Perdomo, 10, who has undergone surgery to correct a cleft lip and palate. “I was mad and sad at the same time.”

    But Ms. Perdomo and about 75 other children and families affected by craniofacial anomalies left Showcase Cinemas North on Saturday with the message to “choose kind,” after a special screening of “Wonder” hosted by the UMass Memorial Children’s Medical Center’s Craniofacial Clinic.

  • November 17, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    Children with craniofacial problems — facial and/or skull — often need multiple surgical procedures, speech therapy, complicated dental treatments and counseling. And like the boy in the film “Wonder,” they can be targets of bullying when they go to school.

    At the regional Craniofacial Anomalies Clinic at UMass Memorial Medical Center, babies from eight weeks to a year old undergo surgeries to repair deficits that can leave a child open to, not only bullying in school, but later-in-life discrimination in the workplace as well as society in general.

  • November 17, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    Children with craniofacial problems — facial and/or skull — often need multiple surgical procedures, speech therapy, complicated dental treatments and counseling. And like the boy in the film “Wonder,” they can be targets of bullying when they go to school.

    At the regional Craniofacial Anomalies Clinic at UMass Memorial Medical Center, babies from eight weeks to a year old undergo surgeries to repair deficits that can leave a child open to, not only bullying in school, but later-in-life discrimination in the workplace as well as society in general.

  • November 13, 2017 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Medical Center President Patrick Muldoon is retiring from his position at the end of January, the hospital announced in November.

    Muldoon began his time with the organization as president of Leominster's UMass Memorial-HealthAlliance Hospital – now UMass Memorial HealthAlliance-Clinton Hospital – nearly 15 years ago.

    Jeff Smith, executive vice president and CEO of the hospital since 2015, will serve as interim president for the duration of a nationwide search.

  • November 1, 2017 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Medical Medical Center President Patrick Muldoon is retiring from his position at the end of January, the hospital said in a press release on Wednesday

    Muldoon began his time with the organization as president of Leominster's UMass Memorial-HealthAlliance Hospital -- now UMass Memorial HealthAlliance-Clinton Hospital -- nearly 15 years ago.

     

  • November 1, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    As planned, the president of UMass Memorial Medical Center is taking early retirement to spend more time with his family, while pledging that he will give back to the health care profession.

    On Aug. 26, 2013, Patrick L. Muldoon took over the top job at UMass Memorial. It was announced Wednesday that he will retire Jan. 31.

    “The reality is I turned 63 last Friday,” Mr. Muldoon said. “My life plan was ... that I would try to retire a little bit early. There are lots of things that I love to do that I haven’t been able to do over the last several years. Everything has aligned and I’m going to stick with my plan.”

    Mr. Muldoon, who said he has always placed a high priority on family, wants to make more time for his “wonderful immediate family,” especially his first grandchild, Cameron Patrick Potvin, age 17 months.

  • October 29, 2017 - Vox News

    It’s difficult to overstate the logistical challenge of responding to the humanitarian crisis facing Puerto Rico and other islands in the Caribbean after Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit. As of September 28, just over a week after Maria struck Puerto Rico, clean water, food, and fuel for generators were still hard to come by, most cell phone sites were out of service, and emergency officials struggled to distribute supplies throughout the island of 3.4 million people.

    These circumstances have compounded what’s being called a “slow motion medical disaster.” It’ll be months before Puerto Rico’s power infrastructure is repaired, and in the meantime, the country is largely running on generators. But if you don’t have fuel to run those generators, you can’t deliver medical care. You can’t operate X-ray machines or keep medicines cool. Without water, people can’t stay hydrated or clean. Without roads, they can’t move patients to hospitals in time, get them food and other life-saving sustaining supplies, like fuel. The death toll is very likely to rise in the coming days.