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  • November 18, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    Victoria Perdomo said she could relate to a scene in the new movie “Wonder” where the main character, Auggie, receives notes telling him his craniofacial anomaly makes him a freak to his schoolmates.

    “Sometimes they would pass notes to me - tell me I’m ugly and a freak,” said Ms. Perdomo, 10, who has undergone surgery to correct a cleft lip and palate. “I was mad and sad at the same time.”

  • November 17, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    Children with craniofacial problems — facial and/or skull — often need multiple surgical procedures, speech therapy, complicated dental treatments and counseling. And like the boy in the film “Wonder,” they can be targets of bullying when they go to school.

    At the regional Craniofacial Anomalies Clinic at UMass Memorial Medical Center, babies from eight weeks to a year old undergo surgeries to repair deficits that can leave a child open to, not only bullying in school, but later-in-life discrimination in the workplace as well as society in general.

  • November 17, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    Children with craniofacial problems — facial and/or skull — often need multiple surgical procedures, speech therapy, complicated dental treatments and counseling. And like the boy in the film “Wonder,” they can be targets of bullying when they go to school.

    At the regional Craniofacial Anomalies Clinic at UMass Memorial Medical Center, babies from eight weeks to a year old undergo surgeries to repair deficits that can leave a child open to, not only bullying in school, but later-in-life discrimination in the workplace as well as society in general.

  • November 13, 2017 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Medical Center President Patrick Muldoon is retiring from his position at the end of January, the hospital announced in November.

    Muldoon began his time with the organization as president of Leominster's UMass Memorial-HealthAlliance Hospital – now UMass Memorial HealthAlliance-Clinton Hospital – nearly 15 years ago.

    Jeff Smith, executive vice president and CEO of the hospital since 2015, will serve as interim president for the duration of a nationwide search.

  • November 1, 2017 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Medical Medical Center President Patrick Muldoon is retiring from his position at the end of January, the hospital said in a press release on Wednesday

    Muldoon began his time with the organization as president of Leominster's UMass Memorial-HealthAlliance Hospital -- now UMass Memorial HealthAlliance-Clinton Hospital -- nearly 15 years ago.

     

  • November 1, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    As planned, the president of UMass Memorial Medical Center is taking early retirement to spend more time with his family, while pledging that he will give back to the health care profession.

    On Aug. 26, 2013, Patrick L. Muldoon took over the top job at UMass Memorial. It was announced Wednesday that he will retire Jan. 31.

  • October 29, 2017 - Vox News

    It’s difficult to overstate the logistical challenge of responding to the humanitarian crisis facing Puerto Rico and other islands in the Caribbean after Hurricanes Irma and Maria hit. As of September 28, just over a week after Maria struck Puerto Rico, clean water, food, and fuel for generators were still hard to come by, most cell phone sites were out of service, and emergency officials struggled to distribute supplies throughout the island of 3.4 million people.

  • October 27, 2017 - Worcester Business Journal

    Worcester-based Community Legal Aid has been awarded a two-year $195,000 grant to help continue a medical-legal partnership with UMass Memorial Health Care.

    Washington, D.C.-based Legal Services Corporation provided the grant.

    As part of the ongoing partnership, UMass will match the funding with a two-year grant of approximately $90,000, UMass said in a press release Thursday.

    The grant funds legal service providers including a full-time staff attorney in primary care clinics, an Americorps advocate and 65 volunteer private attorneys, according to the press release.

  • October 3, 2017 - NBC Boston News

    Nearly two weeks after Hurricane Maria made landfall on Puerto Rico, a team of doctors and nurses from UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, Massachusetts, have arrived back home. The team, which also included first responders, went to the island to assist hospitals that were in disrepair.

  • October 3, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    Gina Smith has responded to many hurricanes and other disasters in the past 23 years, but she hasn’t seen anything quite like the devastation that Hurricane Maria dealt to Puerto Rico.

    “The range of it ... Katrina was more isolated. I don’t think there was any part of the island that was spared,” said Ms. Smith, a registered nurse who is the director of emergency preparedness at UMass Memorial Medical Center.

  • October 2, 2017 - Worcester Business Journal

    Hospitals and outpatient offices owned by UMass Memorial Health Care reap the benefits of being associated with a large healthcare system, but until this week, access to state-of-the-art electronic medical records was not one of them.

     

  • October 1, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    UMass Memorial Health Care launched its new electronic medical records system Sunday, a digital milestone the nonprofit health system has been working on for two years at a cost of about $700 million.

    Information technology workers – many of whom had been at their desks overnight in UMass Memorial’s downtown electronic command post - whooped, clapped and waved commemorative orange towels about 4:25 a.m. as the new system came online.

  • September 14, 2017 - Worcester News Tonight

    Organizations participated in various projects and volunteered their time for a good cause.

  • September 13, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    At age 19, having assumed from her mother more responsibility for her own life, Randi Fournier always makes two plans for her tomorrows, one if she thinks she will be healthy, the other if she’s wrong about that.

    Diagnosed at age 4 with Crohn’s disease, Randi has no memory of her first years when her only health issue might have been that of a runny nose or a scrapped knee.

    “It came on fast and furious,” said her mother, Lisa Fournier, “with bloody stools, constant pain and cramping, fatigue, and an inability to stay out of the bathroom.”

  • September 12, 2017 - MassLive

    Brian Bolduc was set on saving his mother's life when he found out she needed a partial liver transplant to treat her Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis, or liver disease.

    But when he went to UMass Memorial Medical Center to go through the donation steps, the doctor delivered a heartbreaking blow: At 276 pounds, he was too obese to be his mother's donor.

  • September 12, 2017 - MassLive

    As a patient started to seize at UMass, doctors and nurses rushed to his aid, administering Ativan and other drugs, eventually intubating him and working to get him stable.

    They shouted out exactly how much of each drug they gave the patient, so other nurses could enter each and every move into the computer system.

    This was a mannequin patient and a vital part of UMass Memorial Health Care's training to implement its new health care record system, Epic.

     

  • August 31, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    Laurie Hanrahan of Newton stepped out from UMass Memorial Medical Center’s University campus on Wednesday to a startling sight. A sea of purple flags - 2,069 to be exact - fluttered across the quadrangle lawn, where they had been placed by recovery coaches from the UMass Memorial Department of Psychiatry and family and friends of those touched by overdose.

    Each flag represents a person who died from an opioid-related overdose in Massaschusetts in 2016. The display is in observance of International Overdose Awareness Day, Aug. 31.

  • August 20, 2017 - Telegram and Gazette

    For Blake Kadra, arthritis had caused him to stop playing sports, rendered walking and yard work painful, and made him a candidate for total knee replacement surgery.

    But before the surgery, doctors recommended Mr. Kadra lose 20 pounds to see if it would alleviate the pain.

    “It’s hard to do when you can’t move,” Mr. Kadra, 60, said of losing weight.

  • August 20, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    Shaun Ginter, president and CEO of CareWell Urgent Care since 2013, has worked with urgent care centers for more than 10 years. He also frequently seeks care at the centers.

    “I have two young children at home,” Mr. Ginter said. “As you can imagine, things happen, and things happen typically when our pediatricians or our primary care physicians aren’t available.”

  • August 18, 2017 - Telegram & Gazette

    Quade A. Bonds started having grand mal seizures – the type that can cause a loss of consciousness and violent muscle contractions – when he was around 8 years old.

    Now 11, Quade said his seizures occur sporadically and tests and brain scans haven’t helped to pinpoint their cause. Before he experiences one of them, he said he “goes blind,” giving him and his caregivers time to get him to a safe spot while the abnormal electrical activity occurs in his brain.

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