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  • May 6, 2018 - Telegram & Gazette

    t the age of 16, Lisa Colombo began working alongside a nurse at a long-term care facility. It was an experience, she said, that put her on a pathway to a 33-year career in nursing. “I never shifted gears from that moment on,” she recalled. She received an undergraduate degree from Worcester State University, a master’s degree in health administration from Clark University and a doctorate in nursing practice from MGH Institute of Health Professionals. Ms.

  • April 3, 2018 - Telegram & Gazette

    It took Dr. Kevin Floyd, an electrophysiologist at UMass Memorial Medical Center, and his team only about 20 minutes one day last April to negate a major threat to the health and possibly even the life of 86-year-old Northboro resident Bucky — nobody has called him by his first name, Grenville, since he was a teenager — Rogers.

  • March 26, 2018 - Worcester Business Journal

    How should a primary care office measure its success in treating patients? Increasingly, providers are going right to the source and asking patients, and it's starting to pay off.

    "Over time, the bar has continued to be raised," said Barbra Rabson, president and CEO of Massachusetts Health Quality Partners (MHQP), an organization that collects and shares information about health care quality. "There's an expectation and an awareness that patients are the best reporters."

  • March 23, 2018 - Lowell Sun

    David Mercado appeared right at home munching on a homemade oatmeal cookie while reclining on a padded table inside Trinity Lutheran Church in Chelmsford on Tuesday.

    Red Cross attendant and phlebotomist Wilfredo Cruz bustles around him preparing donation equipment. Michael Jackson's classic "Billie Jean" echoed from a stereo across the room. In the skies outside, clouds started to gather as the fourth nor'easter this month barreled toward the area, an uncertain and quickly changing forecast calling for snow yet again.

  • March 22, 2018 - Health

    Is mono contagious? Let’s put it this way: Mono is called “the kissing disease”–and not because there’s anything romantic about it! The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the most common cause of mono, hitches a ride in people’s saliva.

    “You can pass it on when you have direct sharing of secretions, like kissing or sharing a cup,” says Christine Hermos, MD, assistant professor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and pediatric infectious disease specialist at the UMass Memorial Children’s Medical Center.

     

  • March 21, 2018 - Sentinel & Enterprise

    No one can ever question Fitchburg High senior Audrey Johnson's toughness.

    The 17-year-old student-athlete was in a battle for her life last February, as her Jeep tumbled down a 70-foot cliff and landed upside down in the icy waters of Phillips Brook in Fitchburg.

    Johnson eventually managed to free herself from the vehicle and get to the snow-covered embankment, but was at risk of severe hypothermia and her fingers and toes were severely frostbitten after being exposed to the bone-chilling elements for more than an hour.

     

  • March 7, 2018 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Health Care and Reliant Medical Group have launched an online platform designed to help patients get the social services they need, according to a statement from the Worcester-based healthcare providers Wednesday.

    Community Health and Everyday Living Programs (HELP) allows patients and their families find and apply for government and charitable social service programs using an online director. Reliant and UMass Memorial say this will help bridge the gap often experienced by patients between clinical and community-based services.

  • March 7, 2018 - Telegram & Gazette

    UMass Memorial Medical Center is heading into a year of labor negotiations, renovations and growth challenges with an interim president who has studied management, law and medicine.

    Dr. Jeffrey A. Smith, the hospital’s chief operating officer, took over Feb. 1 as interim leader after the retirement of Patrick L. Muldoon, who had been president since 2013. Now as UMass Memorial officials conduct a national search for candidates to replace Mr. Muldoon, Dr. Smith is managing a 779-bed hospital that operates on three Worcester campuses and employs about 10,460 people.

  • March 2, 2018 - NBC10 News Boston

    When men get sick, they are often said to turn into babies. But is the "man flu" a myth?

  • March 1, 2018 - Telegram & Gazette

    Accessing health care and services outside the medical system to keep you healthy can be complicated, especially if English isn’t your primary language.

    On Thursday, Reliant Medical Group and UMass Memorial Health Care unveiled, with dozens of health and social service agencies and elected officials from around the region, an easy-to-use website that lets individuals as well as service providers search for and refer to programs they need. The kickoff was held at the Boys & Girls Club of Worcester.

  • February 27, 2018 - Telegram & Gazette

    In a major expansion of its cardiology services, UMass Memorial Medical Center will begin in the spring to offer technology that will improve the quality of lives as well as increase the number of birthdays for some of the sickest heart patients in Central Massachusetts.

    Mechanical circulatory support devices, also known as ventricular assist devices or VADs, help the heart pump oxygenated blood throughout the body to the other organs when the heart’s own pumping chambers, the ventricles, are too weak to handle that task.

  • February 27, 2018 - Telegram & Gazette

    In a major expansion of its cardiology services, UMass Memorial Medical Center will begin in the spring to offer technology that will improve the quality of lives as well as increase the number of birthdays for some of the sickest heart patients in Central Massachusetts.

    Mechanical circulatory support devices, also known as ventricular assist devices or VADs, help the heart pump oxygenated blood throughout the body to the other organs when the heart’s own pumping chambers, the ventricles, are too weak to handle that task.

  • February 26, 2018 - Telegram & Gazette

    UMass Memorial Heath Care Inc. posted an $11.7 million surplus for its fiscal first quarter by breaking even on operations and boosting results with investment income and gains.

    The nonprofit health system reported about $632 million in total revenue, most of it from patient services, during the three months ended Dec. 31, 2017. That was up about 4 percent from the same period a year earlier.

    Expenses were up about 5 percent over the year to about $632 million.

  • February 25, 2018 - Wall Street Journal

    (Subscription may be required)

    The patient in the operating room was Stanley Kareta, a 29-year-old Army captain who had agreed to donate half of his liver to his wife’s father.

    The older man had a liver disease so advanced that his only hope of survival was a transplant. But with about 14,000 people on the nation’s waiting list for donor livers, most of which come from deceased donors, there was little chance he would be approved for one in time.

     

  • February 17, 2018 - Telegram & Gazette

    About a month ago, Holy Cross basketball player Marcellis Perkins underwent arthroscopic surgery to clean up his troublesome right knee, and since then he has been a regular visitor to HC’s sports medicine department.

  • February 5, 2018 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Medical Center has officially handed the keys over to executive vice president and COO Jeff Smith, who took over for outgoing President Patrick Muldoon on Thursday, the hospital announced.

    The position, however is only for the interim, as the hospital plans to conduct a nationwide search spanning several months.

  • February 5, 2018 - Worcester Business Journal

    On paper, Patrick Muldoon didn't meet all desired criteria for the future leader of UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, when hospital officials were angling to fill the vacant president's post back in 2013.

  • February 1, 2018 - Worcester Magazine

    The rash of heroin overdoses in Massachusetts has left cities and towns grasping for ways to turn the tide. Gov. Charlie Baker has made the drug epidemic — with opioids largely at the center — a focal point of his administration. An ambitious, $110-million plan unveiled late last year took aim not just at making more services available for those struggling with addiction, but also at what many see as among the root causes of the problem: the prescription of opioids that often lead to addiction.

     

  • January 30, 2018 - Telegram & Gazette

    In his role as a forensic evaluator for the Massachusetts Probate and Family Court System, Joseph McGill needed to hear with crystal clarity the words children used when talking about difficult subjects like abuse and neglect.

    “If they tell you something and you don’t hear what they said and you ask them to repeat it, some children think that perhaps they gave the wrong answer,” said McGill.

  • January 24, 2018 - People Magazine

    After being rescued from a California house of horrors, the children allegedly starved, tortured and shackled by their parents for years will experience “long-term effects” but with time can reclaim their lives, says an expert in child psychology and trauma.

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