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  • November 9, 2020 - Boston 25 News

    When it comes to vaccines, everything depends on trust.

    “It’s still skeptical so I’m gonna still keep doing what I’m doing, social distancing until there’s consistency behind it,” said Boston resident Will Lature.

    Even with Pfizer Inc. announcing that its COVID-19 vaccine may be a remarkable 90% effective, based on early and incomplete test results, some people remain less trusting than others.

  • November 5, 2020 - Telegram & Gazette

    The number of children and adolescents seen at the UMass Memorial Medical Center - University Campus for behavioral health needs, including intentional medication overdoses and other suicide attempts, tripled last month, leaving the hospital with a waiting list for beds to treat them.

    Dr. Brian Skehan, director of Child Emergency Mental Health and Child Consult Liaison of Psychiatry at the hospital, said Thursday that he had never before seen a problem this severe throughout the state and he blames the pandemic.

  • November 4, 2020 - Boston Business Journal

    In the midst of dealing with the start of a second coronavirus surge, some hospitals are also readying to respond to election turmoil.

    Much about the election may remain uncertain in the coming days or weeks, as votes are tallied across the country. But hospitals are preparing for a potential increase in volume, whether from violence associated with potential protests or stressed-out residents.

  • November 3, 2020 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester is tightening visitor restrictions again as coronavirus cases rise in the city and across Central Massachusetts.

    Beginning Tuesday, the hospital is allowing only one visitor per day for patients who haven't been diagnosed with coronavirus or are under investigation of having it. Patients who have coronavirus or are under investigation are not allowed any visitors, nor are ambulatory patients.

  • November 1, 2020 - Boston 25 News

    A 'second surge': UMass Memorial CEO says hospitalizations are rising.

  • October 13, 2020 - Fox 25 Boston

    As two COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials and an antibody treatment experiment have been put on hold, there is concern for people’s hope for the ongoing efforts to fight the virus.

    Anxieties can run high when the news is flooded with reports of clinical trial participants falling ill and less than ideal setbacks in what seems to be our only hope in ending the pandemic.

  • October 13, 2020 - Fox 25 Boston

    On Tuesday, Governor Charlie Baker assessed the state’s response to the COVID-19 crisis, saying we have learned so much since the spring surge.

    “We’re going to be living with Covid until there is a vaccine or treatment,” Baker said Tuesday afternoon during a news conference. “But the Commonwealth’s response to this pandemic has been transformational since last spring in nearly every aspect of our daily lives.”

  • October 6, 2020 - Business Wire

    In an article published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Network Open (https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/27

  • October 6, 2020 - Boston Business Journal

    In a year unlike any other, the leaders of Greater Boston's business community are meeting the challenges of 2020 head on.

  • October 5, 2020 - WBZ 4 CBS Boston

    One of the treatments President Trump is receiving for the coronavirus is raising questions for some doctors.

    The President’s doctors say Mr. Trump is taking a steroid called dexamethasone to combat inflammation. It was shown in a study to reduce mortality in patients severely ill with COVID-19.

    Dr. Nicholas Smyrnios, a pulmonologist at UMass Memorial Hospital Medical Center says steroids, such as dexamethasone, have the potential to do harm as well.

  • September 25, 2020 - Boston 25 News

    Healthcare systems across the Commonwealth are readying their COVID-19 surge plans ahead of an anticipated second wave of the virus. Experts predict COVID-19 could once again overwhelm the state next month.

    But staying ahead of a virus that is known to mutate won’t be easy for hospitals, as they must be prepared for whatever comes their way.

    “This is the calm before the second storm. But nobody knows just which way this is going to go and where it’s going to end up,” said Dr. Eric Dickson, president and CEO of UMass Memorial Health Care.

  • September 24, 2020 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Health Care has named its chair of ophthalmology as its new medical group president, effective in December.

    Dr. Shlomit Schaal will succeed Dr. Steve Tosi, who since 2013 has led UMass Memorial Medical Group, which has roughly 1,100 physicians and is the largest physician group in Central Massachusetts. Tosi, who has held multiple leadership positions over 17 years at UMass Memorial, will continue to serve as medical director for UMass Memorial's captive insurance company and system risk management.

  • September 23, 2020 - Fox 25 Boston

    When COVID-19 was surging in Massachusetts in the spring, many hospitals came dangerously close to running out of essential personal protective equipment, or PPE.

    There was a global competition for N95 masks, surgical gowns and gloves, and these lifesaving items were in short supply.

    But out of the those tense moments came valuable lessons on how to prepare for highly infectious diseases. Now, as a fall surge looms over the Commonwealth, hospitals are applying those lessons.

  • September 23, 2020 - Boston Business Journal

    UMass Memorial Health Care has signed an agreement to acquire Harrington Hospital, a deal that would add a fourth community hospital to the Central Massachusetts system.

  • September 20, 2020 - Telegram & Gazette

    UMass Memorial Health Care has a three-month stockpile of personal protective equipment in preparation for the upcoming flu season and a possible second wave of the coronavirus.

    Dr. Kimiyoshi Kobayashi, chief quality officer at UMass Memorial Medical Center, said they are wary of a second COVID-19 surge coming on top of the flu season.

  • September 16, 2020 - Worcester Business Journal

    UMass Medical School in Worcester is collaborating with Johns Hopkins University on two new coronavirus treatment and prevention studies using convalescent plasma.

    The work is seeking to determine whether antibodies from those who've recovered from coronavirus can help those who've either been recently exposed or have symptoms from getting sicker. The two studies are looking in particular at whether giving people antibodies earlier in the illness is effective at treating the virus and in preventing those exposed to it from catching the disease.

  • September 16, 2020 - Telegram & Gazette

    UMass Memorial Health Care and Air Methods put a new LifeFlight helicopter into service on Sept. 11. The new whirlybird, a EC145 Eurocopter, is a twin-engine light utility helicopter that weighs close to 2 tons and has a wingspan of 36 feet. It will be replacing a EC135 Eurocopter, which weighs roughly 800 pounds less and wingspan is 3 feet shorter.

  • September 11, 2020 - Telegram & Gazette

    The injuries Dan Hall suffered June 23, when the motorcycle he was riding collided with a vehicle on Plantation Street, were about as severe as you can get while still surviving.

    He lost one arm in the crash, and the other was severely damaged. He also lost his spleen, broke his back and various other bones, and he was disemboweled.

    In an interview Thursday, his mother, Susan Hall of Worcester, said staff at UMass Memorial Medical Center – University Campus told her they hadn’t seen someone that badly hurt in 20 years.

  • September 8, 2020 - CBS 4 Boston

    Hospitals in Massachusetts are already gearing up for a rise in COVID-19 cases as the temperature drops.

    Nick Duncan, the Director of Emergency Management at Tufts Medical Center, said his team has already stockpiled personal protective equipment and bolstered their testing capabilities. They have developed a four phase approach to addressing a potential “second surge” based on different metrics.

    Duncan said the goal is to avoid canceling elective procedures, the way hospitals did during the spring surge.

  • September 8, 2020 - WBUR

    Dr. Maria Diaz, a primary care physician in Lawrence, thinks she has a plan that will allow her to keep working this fall. Her kindergartener has a full day, in-person option through his pre school. Her second grader will go live with in-laws in Sharon for the three weekdays when her public school is remote. On the two days when the second grade classes are in person, Diaz hopes to be able to work from home.

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